Denpa-teki na Kanojo, episode 1 – tropes

Before we start let me say that this is not a review of Denpa-teki na Kanojo. If you want a review – we already have one written by Shaurya, you are welcome to read it. Here I want to discuss this OVA rather than to review it, so I’ll assume you’ve seen it. It is a good show by the way, and it is fairly short too, so if you haven’t seen it you can start watching it now and come back in 40 minutes =)

Ame Ochibana

I decided to write about Denpa-teki na Kanojo because it gives me a great opportunity to talk about certain recurring setups in anime. Before we start though I would ask you to try not to let any negative preconceptions about these tropes to guide you as you are reading.

The first trope I want to mention is “harem”, basically it is a setup where you have a guy and a group of girls who are showering him with their attention. It is a weird definition, but I find that it works pretty well. I’d personally consider it to be a harem setup if there are at least three girls who show interest in the protagonist. If there are just two of them you can use more specific terms like love triangle or something; these are just words anyways. First episode of Denpa-teki fits this pattern nicely, as Fujishima Kanako (the class rep girl), Satsuki Miya (the girl who turned out to be a psycho) and Ochibana Ame (the Juu’s knight with weird haircut) are all talking with Juu (the protagonist boy) almost exclusively, and each of them shows a distinct interest in him, though their feelings may be different in nature and depth.

Juu Juuzawa and Miya Satsuki

What do you think, does it make sense to call it a “trope”? If you have a character-driven show it is only natural that there would be people of both genders, and since all of them are teenagers it is also natural that there would be a bit of a romantic tension there. And since Denpa-teki is a short anime you can argue that there wasn’t enough room for more than one male lead, so it just happens that Juu has lots of girls interacting with him. Right?

Juu with Ame

While this is a reasonable thing to say, I don’t think it is quite right. Regardless of the writer’s intentions, making your protagonist seem popular with the opposite gender affects the way the show works. Supposedly, it makes the guys who watch the anime associate themselves with the protagonist, and it makes the girls pay more attention towards him because he is popular. These ideas sort of popular are psychology-based speculations, and it is a broad-brush picture. It doesn’t have to work this way, if at all, for you in particular, my dear reader, so don’t complain :P So anyway, making your protagonist popular will likely change the way your audience views him, in particular it would likely make people to wish him well. And this can be exploited.

Kanako Fujishima

Let me give you an example of another show that falls under the harem definition I gave. In Neon Genesis Evangelion its protagonist Shinji Ikari is living together with Misato Katsuragi and Asuka Langley. He is also the only friend of Rei Ayanami, thus making it thee girls none of whom likes him very much, but they do hang out together almost constantly. This anime definitely does exploit the extra attention that Shinji’s popularity draws to him. It does so by making him fail miserably at everything he tries and by making him give up without trying half the time. So, because you wanted him to succeed you feel disappointment, frustration and even anger. Read what people say about Shinji, you’ll see just how well this worked out, he is a legitimate contender to be the #1 in the “most hated characters” list. All because the show is very effective at making you wish for Shinji to succeed. Of course, it is not just about him being popular with the girls, there are like half a dozen different ways the anime establishes him as a character you root for. Check it out, it is a pretty great anime series.

Shinji Ikari, Misato Katsuragi, Rei Ayanami and Asuka Langley. The white haired boy is also a friend of Shinji’s

So with Evangelion I’d say using the harem trope was an effective choice that helped the show in achieving its goals. What about Denpa-teki na Kanojo? It is similar, in a way. Imagine you don’t care about Juu at all. Then the events of the OVA become bland, like a not-so-scary horror film. But then imagine that you do root for Juu very much. Or, better still, imagine that you are Juu. Then how do you feel about Fujishima’s death? She is a person who was always running around you, she was a classmate, she was generally friendly and so on. Feels pretty horrible, right? And what about Satsuki’s betrayal? Forget the emotional side of the situation, just being beaten up with a bat and then stabbed is awful enough already. This is how the first episode of Denpa-teki na Kanojo is supposed to work, I think. It tries its hardest to make you root for Juu, and then it uses this connection between the viewer and the character to deliver the impact.

Juu with Satsuki

If you doubt that the OVA was set up to exploit this trick, remember when Juu was attacked by Satsuki. It was a second after she finished a sentence that was worded as if she was going to admit her love for him. If you were gonna root for Juu this was the time. And a second later he is beaten with a bat but that same girl.

 

So, I think this trope can be used as a writing tool, rather than just being a fanservice device. Of course, there are dozens of anime where harem is the genre, and that is a different story altogether. Also there are anime like The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, where the harem setup seems to be used only to make the show more appealing, so in a way it is just a fanservice.

The second trope I wanted to talk about is quite similar to the first one, but it is slightly less obvious. I would call it designing a character to be likable. In Denpa-teki it is Juu, of course. Lets describe him. He is a strong and brave guy with a clear sense of justice. He is slightly wild, but not dangerous. In fact, even when attacked he might not fight back, if there is a reason not to. He would rather get hurt than let another person be hurt. He wouldn’t take advantage of a girl, even if there are no consequences and more over he wouldn’t even want to be in such a position. He is sensitive, being able to understand how a person feels, even if that person offended him or physically hurt him. This particular trait has an absurd magnitude, as Juu is able to be worried about a person who just broke his arm and leg. Even when stabbed in the gut, he thinks of the mental torment his attacker is in. He is also a nice guy to hang out with. When he decided to spend time with Ame he asks her where they should go to, even though she was willing to tail him wherever he himself would want to go. He treats Ame as a person and as an equal even though she constantly suggests that she is his servant.

So, what do you think? Half of those traits are just a normal behavior of a good person. Being strong, brave, just, chivalrous, selfless, nice, that is a reasonable package for a protagonist, there are tons of characters like this. But that is not all there is to it. While the traits themselves are fine, the show obviously puts a lot of effort into showing that Juu has ’em, to the point that half the anime’s run time is spent on establishing his character. As a consequence it feels like half the show was written in such a way as to allow for Juu to display various aspects of his personality.

The disproportional amount of time the show spends on Juu, the more than impressive set of great qualities he has, the fact that the show is willing to throw some of its realism out of the window to make Juu look cooler (as with the scenes where he displays kindness towards Satsuki who tries to kill him), the fact that the show is interested in minute details of his personality while the rest of the cast gets a bare minimum of development, all this makes Juu a “designed to be likable” character, at least in my opinion. In particular, it seems he is sort of designed to feel dateable, as a good portion of of his qualities relate to the way he treats girls. Also his character does not display any human faults that would allow him to grow later, which shows that the writers weren’t interested in his dynamics, rather they wanted to see him in his perfect form from the get-go. And, as I mentioned, some of his actions seem unrealistic and even clash with his personality, which indicates that giving him those characteristics was more important than keeping him “real”. These choices are also a part of the reason I call him a “designed” character.

Just to make it clear, I wouldn’t call most of the characters designed to be anything because they aren’t. Satsuki and Fujishima are both just functional characters, they serve their purpose and that is pretty much all there is to them. Ame has a bunch of different and interesting characteristics, but they don’t have a purpose; she isn’t meant to fit in any kind of mold, like Juu is. Most anime characters aren’t designed to be anything, they are just written to the best of writer’s abilities to fit into the story, serve their role and hopefully be interesting. Sometimes a character would fall into an archetype or something like that, but as often as not it wasn’t because the writers wanted it to happen, but rather because they couldn’t do any better or didn’t care at all.

At any rate, the designed to be likable Juu serves the same purpose as the first trope, making you more invested in the guy and in all the stuff that happens to him. I think all together it does a reasonable job, and the episode leaves a good aftertaste too. Tropes often feel like a lazy writing, but in the case of Denpa-teki na Kanojo they seem to work fine. The show’s impressive visual language holds your attention, and the writing is fairly clever too. Just as an example, remember the scene where Juu asks Ame to hit him because he was doubting her, thinking she was the murderer? She hits him making him bleed. This establishes yet another great quality of Juu’s, him being proactive in setting things right, apologizing the way that would not take advantage of the meek disposition of the person he apologizes to. But it also shows that Ame is not a doll and has feelings as well. If she wasn’t at least slightly annoyed with Juu’s lack of trust she wouldn’t have hit him hard enough to make him bleed. This is a clever way of achieving two goals with a single brief scene.

What do you think about it? Do you think the use those setups I talked about takes away from the anime? Do you think it is meaningful to talk about designed characters the way I did? See you in the comments ^^/

Colorful

I’ve recently watched Colorful, a 2010 movie suggested to me by Shaurya. The movie follows a person who had died but was given a chance to redeem himself. He was reincarnated in a body of Makoto Kobayashi, a boy who killed himself with sleeping pills overdose. After the reincarnation the new Makoto needs to deal with the echoes of the Makoto’s life before the incident, the problems that lead up to his suicide.

I would say Colorful is a serious movie, at least compared to other things I’ve been watching recently. It might be a little hard to watch at times, but it definitely isn’t boring. Makoto’s mother acting is one of the best I’ve seen in a long while, I almost want to watch the movie again just to see it again (even though her role is such a sad one). If you like movies directed by Hayao Miyazaki, Satoshi Kon, Makoto Shinkai, you should check this one out. It would be different, but chances are you’ll like it.

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Puru Puru, sort of an angel that guides Kobayashi

Now time for spoilers. Though before the spoilers begin let me make a little detour and talk about stories in anime. Most anime do have a story, and it can be quite complex. The story can be told directly by the characters or a narrator, or it can be acted out; some of the events can be only alluded to without being shown. You can hide your story behind hints and metaphors, tell it through references, and since it is anime you can use words, pictures, sound and motion to construct those hints and references. Though if you aren’t careful no one will be able to decipher what the story was.

With this in mind most shows limit this complexity so the viewer can instantly see what is going on, at least in the more important parts of the film/series. But the possibility to do more than the ‘simple things’ is exciting, and people do go for it. This creates an interesting situation where most of the story is being told directly in a simple manner, but some of it is hidden and requires some effort to discover. And this is one of the things I like to write about, my feeble attempts to search for those additional parts of the story.

Now Colorful is pretty interesting in this aspect. I hope I’ll be able to explain why as we go. Let us start by recounting events of Makoto’s life, in chronological order. The earliest part of Makoto’s life that we get to see is his days at school where he was bullied and apparently didn’t have any friends. Now we jump to the time before his suicide. He lives in a family where people grew distant from each other, and it might have been in this state for a long time. At this time Makoto has feelings for his classmate Hiroka. Too bad for him, he sees the girl walking out of a love hotel with a middle-aged guy, which I guess would be hard on a boy. What’s more he also sees his mother walking out of that hotel with another man. Somehow all this drove him to take his own life.

What do you think, does it sound like a reasonable story? I can’t say that it is unrealistic, but I don’t feel like it makes sense. All of this was told very briefly and we don’t get to see how Makoto was reacting to those events. Maybe that is the reason why I can’t put this together with the Makoto that we do get to see in the movie. I can see how realizing that your crush is selling herself or is in love with another guy would be traumatizing and I can see how seeing that your mother is unfaithful to your father would be painful, but I don’t think this would drive the present Makoto to commit suicide. I feel like Makoto would need to show a completely different side of his character in order to make this story work.

Kobayashi family

Kobayashi family

Alright, now we get to the present Makoto. The guy is a piece of work for sure. He is bad at studying (or at least he doesn’t try to be good at it), he doesn’t have friends except Hiroka, he rejects the only other person who tries to communicate with him – his other classmate Shouko. After learning about his mother’s affair he starts acting cold towards her, refusing to eat her cooking, take things she buys for him. The more she tries to be nice to him, the more rude his actions towards her get. At some point Makoto tells his mother that her presence makes him want to puke. He doesn’t have hard feelings towards the rest of his family though. We see Makoto spending time with his father, and their conversation was at least free from aggression.

Makoto’s attitude towards his mother gradually deteriorates. The climax is reached when he accuses her of adultery and runs away from home. Consequently he is beat up by a gang of older boys and has to stay home to recover. And by this time Makoto and Hiroka had a conversation and Makoto kind of had to accept that she willingly sells herself, that this is who she is. You can notice how this resembles the situation right before his suicide. Both times Makoto was isolated from everyone, gave up on his family and heavy consequences followed.

Kobayashi Makoto

Now why does this happen to Makoto? Well this time it literally is him turning his back on his family. Was it the same the last time then? Or was it his family neglecting him?.. What I don’t like about all of those statements is their simplicity. It feels like I am describing a Naruto episode, not a serious movie. No offence to Naruto, but “family is sacred, period” is the general attitude the show has :P

I will stop there with the chronological order. I’ll stop because there is no way I can fit in the last part, the part where Makoto recovers his relations with his family. Let me explain myself. So far the events made some sort of sense. Makoto killed himself because he wasn’t able to find support from his family before. Now he rejects this support and his life falls apart again. It is a story about the importance of realizing the value of people around you. Makoto’s father even spells it all out for the audience. By the end of the movie Makoto will recognize Shouko as a friend; he also makes a new friend Saotome, who becomes the key stone to Makoto’s change. So, chronologically the story begins in a coherent way, and it ends in a coherent way. But I can’t connect the beginning and the end. Why did Makoto stop hating his mother? Why did he recognize the importance of his family?

To answer this question I would need to throw away the answers we already got. “It is a story about the importance of realizing the value of people around you” – lets forget about it. Instead lets look at Makoto bullying his mother. The more she tries to be nice to him the nastier he gets. One of the strongest moments in their interaction was when they are about to have dinner together and Makoto imagines his mother’s hands preparing the meal, which produces a violent reaction from him. His behavior towards her is disturbing exactly because it is so illogical. He is not just ungrateful, it is as if he finds his mother’s care offensive.

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To quote the subs “the more she fulfills her responsibilities as a mother the angrier I become for some reason”

And that is exactly it. He does find it offensive. Look at Makoto. As a person he is fairly grown up, with self assurance and independent thinking. All his actions show that he would be fine left alone, thrown into life to enjoy it or be beaten by it. Look at what the boy does. He follows his love interest around, when he sees an opportunity he forcibly takes her away from a date with another guy; and when he realizes that the love interest doesn’t care much about him he lets her leave. Compare this to his behavior towards Shouko. Being in his room, being expected to behave in a nice manner, being a good classmate and a good boy in general – Makoto protests against all of that. He protests against being treated like child, being taken care of by his mother. And on the surface level the feeling is so illogical that he himself likely doesn’t understand it’s origin. That is why he clings to this made up reason to hate his mother. It shouldn’t matter to him if his mother had an affair, he is broad-minded enough to accept things like that.

Looking at it this way it becomes clear why the movie spends so much time with Makoto and his mother. It is not easy to show this complicated problem, the problem of being sheltered and taken care of too much. Makoto’s mother honestly does all she can to help him. She even recognizes his antagonism and goes along with it. You can’t blame her for anything in this situation. Makoto, on the other hand, acts in an awful way and isn’t willing to do anything to remedy the situation. It seems the only way out was for his mom to leave Makoto alone, to stop worrying about him. Now do you see a contradiction? A few paragraphs above we were talking about how being neglected had lead to Makoto suicide. So which is it?

At this point, it almost seems like the movie can’t decide what it wants to say. Alright, let’s just look at it some more. I will pick up where I left, the moment Makoto recovers from being beat up. Soon after his recovery he starts spending time with Saotome, another guy from his class. They go around the city together, wasting time looking at old train routs. They go shopping together, talk about things, even think about what school they should apply to. Both seem to enjoy each other company, and their friendship even motivates Makoto to study. That is interesting because at this point Makoto believes he won’t be around by the time they go to that other school.

Makoto would later say about Saotome “he is the first friend I’ve ever made”, and the emphasis should be placed on the word “I”. There were other people who kind of came to be close to Makoto, but they weren’t exactly friends, and he didn’t do much to become their friend. In a way becoming friends with Saotome was an independent act, something that Makoto did for himself, without being guided. I think that was important for him. The plan to go to the same school that Makoto and Saotome made together, their decision to study together, them spending time together, it was the little part of independent life that I believe Makoto needed. Well, but how important is this friendship for the story? Why did it suddenly appear out of nowhere in such an intense part of the movie? I’ve said that Saotome is “a key stone to Makoto’s change”. I meant the way this event is placed, it seems like it was what lead to Makoto reconsidering his relations with his family. And I don’t know how it works. Maybe being around Saotome Makoto remembered what it is like to be a normal nice human, not a spoiled brat?.. I don’t know, but I would like to know.

Also there was Makoto going fishing with his father. While his father tried to catch fish he had time to paint, the first time he did it after the suicide. This is an important detail, cause it is an early hint that Makoto is Makoto, that the soul/mind occupying his body are his soul/mind. Makoto’s conversation with his father is one sided, but it does what it needed to do. It tells Makoto that his family care about him together, it isn’t just his mother who does. Later Makoto and his father go to a street noodle shop where Makoto’s father shares his food with him. It kind of mirrors the scene where Makoto and Saotome share their food, probably a metaphor for Makoto becoming friends with his dad.

The highest point of the story comes where the Kobayashi family have dinner together and they discuss a possible school for Makoto. Through the discussion Makoto instead of becoming more and more offensive, as he usually did, went to tears and actually pleaded for his own decision to be considered. His brother also speaks up for the first time. Unlike Makoto’s parents who have unlimited patience, Makoto’s brother seems to be fed up with Makoto and he tells him that up front. It is an important moment too; a fair bit of honesty is an important part of family relations. Long story short, the family seems to reconcile and Makoto seems to stop his aggression towards his mother.

Makoto Kobayashi

We also learn that that time when Makoto was beat up he was in a temple where he used to play as a child. It is the second hint that the soul/mind he has are his own. I bring up this and the other small details in order to sort of demonstrate that this movie does care about this stuff, giving the viewer hints as to what is about to come next. And this brings another question. We only learn details about Makoto’s past at the very end of the film. So are those details important? If they are, then the viewer is forced in the situation where he can only appreciate the story after he finishes the film and either goes over it in his head or watches it the second time. And I don’t think Colorful is this kind of movie, I don’t think it would do that to its viewer. But if Makoto’s past isn’t important to understand what is going on in the film, then what? What is the movie about? The idea that “it is a story about the importance of realizing the value of people around you” sort of relies on Makoto’s past. But the idea that this movie is about an overly sheltered youth doesn’t explain why he suddenly gave in and embraced his family. And it raises a question why they even needed to put that rushed story about Makoto’s past in the film in the first place.

I feel the only answer I can come up with would be repeating what Makoto told Hiroka about people being colorful. It is not a real answer though, it is just saying that Makoto’s ways may be weird and it might be hard to see any reason in his actions, and that this is fine, that is how people are. Maybe we should accept Makoto the same way Makoto accepts Hiroka and doesn’t question her ways of living. I don’t know if I am happy with this answer, but is ties up the film for me. Also earlier I was thinking about those questions I’ve written above I couldn’t find an answer. Then I went to watch certain parts of the movie again, and this dialogue between Makoto and Hiroka came up; and with that awesome vocal soundtrack in the background Makoto spelled out what I was looking for for me. So I just can’t turn down this explanation now ^^/

Colorful

Colorful

Sorry if this was a bit too boring to read. Now you see what I meant by “Colorful is pretty interesting in this aspect” – it almost tells you two different stories at the same time =) So what do you think?

3 Level Combination

3 Level Combination is a Korean comic by Il-Kwon Ha, the guy you may know as the author of Annarasumanara. Shaurya recommended me both of those manhwa, and I am really glad she did. Here I want to talk about what I think about that comic. I’ll make a tiny introduction for those who haven’t read it and put a spoiler warning before the part where I start to go deeper into the story.

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3 Level Combination starts as a story about a boy Hogu, a boy from a poor family who is being bullied at school. We follow him around, observing how he is being humiliated, beaten and otherwise abused by a group of his classmates. It gets pretty heavy and the story doesn’t hold back at all. After a while a new character is introduced, a humanoid robot prototype named Chevrolet. That robot was supposed to attend school together with normal students as a part of its testing. For better or worse the robots ends up becoming Hogu’s friend, while Hogu is put in charge of keeping it safe. With this event the both the story and Hogu’s life become more complex, going through tragic and happy moments, always unpredictable and thought provoking. Please read it, it is very good.

I want to mention that for me 3 Level Combination was a really hard read, I even had to make a break for a few weeks, because I felt a bit overwhelmed. It is just my personal thing though, stories about abused people living in misery kinda get me. I don’t know if that affected my opinion about the comic, though.

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Spoilers start from here.

I want to talk about a few of the characters, and since I myself can barely remember any names from this comic I decided to list them all beforehand. Besides Hogu I am going to be talking his former friend Minwoo, his class president Anna and her father Dr. Lee. Hope it won’t get too long.

I think a good way to start thinking about this story is with Dr. Lee. Who was that person? We know he was largely responsible of making a complete mess of his family life. His wife committed suicide after seeing him clearly displaying preference for a female humanoid robot over her. He said that the robot is better because “it is obedient”, because it is “his type”. He was a sad man who wasn’t able to appreciate the people around him and would rather play with toys. And his story doesn’t even seem all that interesting. The main reason I’ve brought it up is his daughter Anna.

I think Anna might be the central figure to this whole story, and I will try to explain what I mean. What defines Anna as a person? She grew up in a broken family and saw a lot more ugliness of human relations than a child should. Do you remember what was her reaction to that? She would say that it was “boring”. Such an inadequate description, such an obviously wrong choice of words. But let’s go on. Anna’s mother committed suicide because her father brought home a robot and stated that he liked it more than his wife. Naturally that influenced the way Anna felt about robots. She learnt to hate them. She even decided to study robots to prove that they can never be humans. Now let’s pause and think about it. Why would she do that? It is not a disgust towards machines that can be understood in her situation. What’s more, she was still working with her dad. I think what we see here is Anna misplacing the responsibility for what happened in her family; instead of blaming her father entirely she puts a part of the responsibility on the robots. It should be easy to realize that Dr. Lee’s self-centered destructive behavior was the reason Anna’s family ended up in the state it is. He could have had any other occupation, it wouldn’t have mattered, it wouldn’t have changed the fact that he didn’t appreciate his wife and was abusive.

So here is what I am getting at. I think a large part of Anna’s character is self-deception and neglect. Just as she was pretending to be bored to ignore her pain as a child she now pretended that the robots are to blame for what happened in her family. Why would she do it this time – who knows, but an obvious reason is so that she would be able to live on with her father without losing her mind because of the cognitive dissonance.

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You’ve probably noticed that I didn’t justify the word “neglect” yet. To talk about that I will need to jump to another character I’ve said I would talk about, Minwoo. He, Hogu, and Anna were friends back when they were younger and Hogu was what kept them together. In the quick episode where Hogu takes a picture of Anna and Minwoo it is pretty obviously hinted that in this friendship Anna was mostly interested in Hogu, while Minwoo was more interested in Anna. And apparently she was oblivious to that. What’s more, this never stopped, with the only exception that after a while Minwoo started to target Hogu, making his school life worse and worse. It might have been jealousy, might have been a desire to get Anna’s attention, likely it was both. And it seems that Anna could have stopped the whole thing, as she did in chapter 17, just by asking Minwoo to do so. But she never even tried to talk to him, never started a conversation in the whole year, as Minwoo mentioned once. Imagine if she did, if she thought through this situation and realized Minwoo motives. Anna is smart, she definitely could do it. And if she asked Minwoo to stop hurting Hogu, then maybe there wouldn’t have been any fights in that class. And going from what we saw of Minwoo I think that is the only thing she needed to do was to ask, there wouldn’t have been conditions or price. But Anna never even thought about it. That is what I mean by “neglect”.

Minwoo 3 Level Combination

Minwoo

I am sorry if you think I’ve spend more than enough time on Anna, but I have to go a little further. In the late chapters we see Anna repeatedly putting effort into making Hogu see that Chevrolet is a robot and hence his friendship with it is absurd. She doesn’t see (or prefer to not notice) the simple fact that Chevrolet was the only one who showed Hogu kindness and care, who spent time with him when he needed it. It is so simple to see, and it is so easy to then understand why the boy would be so attached to the thing, regardless of its nature. What’s more, it is not hard to imagine that Anna might have wanted to be the one who did all of that for Hogu; only she didn’t do it. She would say that Chevrolet was a piece of metal, only the reality was that this robot was more of a human then most of the people around it. And instead of embracing that reality Anna would rather destroy it. She did, with a lie, betrayal and murder, a one act that took away all she had, including her own conscience.

I find it interesting that throughout most of the story Anna doesn’t do anything wrong, and there is no way to blame her. She isn’t hurting anyone, even does good things here and there. Nevertheless, it is as if her way of life slowly places a rope around her heck. It is one of the most interesting character arcs I’ve seen in a long time.

3LC 2

 

It doesn’t feel right to talk about supporting characters all this time and leave out Hogu and Chevrolet. But I don’t think I have as much to say about them. I like their story. It is the kind of story you would want to end on a happy note. While reading I thought that maybe they will use this bomb episode to say that from now on Chevrolet can’t be opened and since her remote control functions were disabled she could effectively become a human. That would open a possibility for a nice ending for both her and Hogu. I was also prepared for Chevrolet’s demise; I think Hogu would have survived that, and I wonder what kind of person would he ended up being. Neither of that happened though.

The actual end made me think of the Romeo and Juliet play. It used be regarded as the greatest love story of all. I’ve heard that since some time ago people started to look at it in a new light, considering Romeo and Juliet to be a cautionary tale about irresponsible passion of young people. I can see that point of view and I don’t think it takes away anything from the romantic side of the play. What’s more, I think the same argument can be made for the story of Hogu and Chevrolet. Do you want to see their story and it’s end as a beautiful romantic tragedy? Or do you want to see it as a tale that says “Don’t be as foolish as this boy was.”? Both ways are good I think. I like the ending, even though it does make the story even more sad.

One more thing. I imagine 3 Level Combination would naturally make you wonder about human-robot relations, asking yourself “What was this friendship between Hogu and Chevrolet? Was it different from the relations Dr. Lee had with his old robot? Can you take any of this seriously?”. I think the comic doesn’t have a lot to say about robots and their potential place as a new kind of sentient beings in our society. Was Hogu any different from Dr. Lee – I have no idea. It is a very hard question, and I don’t see any answers in the manhwa.

Sorry if this post was a bit too long. See you next time!

Annarasumanara

Annarasumanara is a short Korean manga I finished reading recently.If you don’t know about it and wanna hear my opinion – here it is. Annarasumanara is probably the best comic I’ve read so far. The story is great, and if you are willing to spend a little time thinking it over you get even more from it. Characters, art style, the way pages are arranged, all that is very different from what I’ve seen in manga and anime. Check it out.

The rest of this post is intended for those who have read the manga already, I won’t explain all that happens in the story, just assume you know about it. Sorry ^^’

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I intentionally didn’t cut this picture; I think this scrolling down that you keep doing when reading the manga is more or less a part of it and I wanted to bring a little bit of that feeling back :P

What is Annarasumanara about? Korean students’ welfare? Magic? Life choices? In the beginning I thought that it is going to be a story about a girl who wants to grow up as an escape from the kind life she has now. She is being dragged through the mud of adult world, and then through a dreamland of child’s fantasies of the magician. Ai’s story is full of little turns and vignettes that don’t necessarily lead anywhere. Like that episode with a burger. Someone ate a bite and left it, and hungry Ai who was cleaning the tables was facing this little problem – eat it and satisfy her hunger or keep her pride. She ate the burger; and nothing happened. She is a strong person, hurt pride isn’t enough to seriously affect her. You see what I am talking about, this story is just one little episode that doesn’t go anywhere, but at the same time it maybe is the first time writer tells us that “breaking norms is okay”; or maybe it is more like “here is this girl you sympathize with, she just finished someones burger, are you gonna change your opinion about her?”. At the end of the book this is going to be one if the central points. When in the last part of the manga Il Deung breaks the norm (or just breaks a window, depends on how you see it :P), it is being celebrated by changing his appearance, the way he is drawn. From this point on he looks normal, while before his head was deformed in a weird way. You can’t applaud your character in a more literal way.

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So what I wanted to say is that Ai’s story is very rich in many ways. But what is even more interesting is the direction it was heading. Look at Ai in the beginning and in the end of the manga. Did she change? Maybe she grew up a little, learned more about life, learned to accept her own desires more; but that is not much. The road she planned for herself had not changed, the way she was heading towards becoming a “boring adult” stayed the same. The manga took us through a very bright and breath-taking period of her life, but it didn’t change anything for her.

Same with Il Deung, he didn’t change either. There was so much talk about him going off his asphalt road to the bed of flowers, he even had this moment of catharsis after witch his appearance changed. But at the end he became a college student, same as Ai, same as he and his parents planned all along.

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So what is up with that? I think the answer to this question lies in magician’s character and his back story. See, Ryu is the one who did not fit into this pattern. He did change his ways, back many years ago. And we all know what he became. An outcast, a man who lives in his illusions. Those are beautiful illusions, but never the less, they are not reality. He does “real magic”, but really every time he performs, it is just an act that masks the ugliness of actual reality. I am not judging him, it is fine for him to live the way he wants. But the fact remains that he does not fit into society. And think about this, that kind of life, it is not what Ai can enjoy. She need to take care of her sister, she wants to escape poverty; I’m sure she has other ambitions as well. And unlike Ryu all those ambitions are her own, it wasn’t like others pushed those goals onto her. See the difference? Ai is a real person with real goals and real problems. Ryu is like a fairy tale character, and his life turned like that because of the problems he had in his head, but not in reality. And their ways can’t be the same.That is the message of this story, I think. That if you live on Earth you can’t follow a shooting star. You can enjoy looking at it, you can run the direction it points, but yours is the Earth and its is the sky. It is a message that does not looks all that positive, when you put it this way. I like it though, just as I like everything that is not obvious but makes sense ^^

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There is this very nice pair of events that illustrate what I’m saying. Remember this moment when Il Deung snaps and the guy who tried to frame Ryu? Il Deung tries to hit him. And remember how Ryu snaps at the girl who spilled his cards? The two events mirror each other, but how different are they. Il Deung cares about something that happened in reality, something that is an actual problem, a dishonorable act of injustice. Ryu, he cares about a ruined magic trick for a group of children. It is like the two of them live in different worlds, even though at this time the similarity between Ryu and Il Deung was shown pretty clearly.

I liked this story a lot. Very thankful to Shaurya who suggested it to me \^^/ Thank you =)

Till the next time  (^_^)/

To see all my posts on manga click here: Posts on mangaTo see the catalog of the posts published in this blog click here.